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Tributes to

F. Clark Howell

1925-2007

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(alphabetical)

We have lost one of the fathers of Paleoanthropology. His scientific and personal character cannot be replaced and, in this way, this is a terrible lost for our science. We need tutorial people like him, with clear ideas and a long term vision. Fortunatelly, he left an enormous heritage, both in terms of publications and persons.

-Jordi Agusti 

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With deep regret, we have learnt the passing away of Prof. Howell. We, all the members of Yarimburgaz Team/Istanbul liked and respected him very much. We offer our sincerest condolences to Howell family. Guven Arsebuk and Yarımburgaz Excavation Team Š Istanbul /Turkey

-Guven Arsebuk - Yarimburgaz Team 

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It is with great shock and sadness that I learned of Prof. Howell passing away. I send my sincere condolences to family and close friends of Prof. Howell. I know Prof. Howell as a good-natured and helpful person and one who has dedicated his life for the development of paleoanthropolgy. We will miss him greatly and certainly there will be a gap in the expertise. May he rest in peace.

-Mesfin Asnake 

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May the long-time sun „ Shine upon you „ All love surround you „ And the pure light within „ Guide your way on

-Lucinda Ruth Backwell 

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I just learned of Clark's passing this morning by way of the New York Times. As a student of his at the University of Chicago, I encountered an intellect and eloquence, uncommon even in the hallowed halls of academia. Three years ago when he visited Rutgers, I had the opportunity to renew our acquaintance -- an occasion I still recall with fondness. Clark served as an enduring inspiration to many of us as we pursued our chosen life paths.

-Joseph Blumberg 

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It was during the Omo expedition in the 1970Õs that I met Clark. I was an unknown French PhÕsD student and he generously invited me to join his multidisciplinary team. These years remain amongst the most stimulating and encouraging of my professional life. It was not only the excitement of working in the Wild Africa, Clark made these months fruitful, enjoyable and rich in exchange and knowledge, trying to solve the mystery of Human Origin. For him, doing Science was working hard, getting new evidences, new facts. I have tried always to remember that lesson. The months spent in the field during several years, under his leadership, remain a unique scientific experience that largely influenced and determined my career at CNRS. Later, we met several times, during meetings and friendly circumstances in France or at Berkeley, rare moment of great pleasure, such as too briefly during the palaeo-anthropology meeting in Tempe. The memory and the message of Clark will always be present with us. A picture of him 1972, thinking nearby the Omo river, as an expression of my debt of gratitude and affectionate thoughts to his wife Betty.

-Raymonde Bonnefille 

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It is great sadness that I learned of Prof. Howell passing away. I had the luck to meet him on during the 1988 and 1989 Yarimburgaz Cave Excavations (Turkey). I shall remember him always with respect. I send my sincere condolences to family. May he rest in peace.

-Ahmet Boratav 

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It was with great sadness that I learned of ClarkÕs death this afternoon. Although Clark was on my Ph.D. committee, few people know how influential he was in shaping my academic and personal life. I owe him an eternal debt of gratitude for always having faith in me.

-Steven Brandt 

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As a young scholar, attending my first international meeting, I first met Clark in Frankfurt in 1991. At this, and a subsequent meeting in London, Clark went out of his way to be supportive and encouraging. Made a tremendous impression on me at the time, gave me the gift of confidence, and taught me the value of a few kind words. I will always be grateful.

-Peter Brown 

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Clark Howell was, of course, one of the principal architects of paleoanthropology, as we know the field today. In addition to being a premier scholar, Clark was an exemplar mentor who fulfilled his responsibilities with charm, warmth, and timeliness. I was fortunate to include him on my graduate committee at the University if Chicago, where I benefited enormously from his wisdom and his high standards for professionalism. My sincere condolences to his wife Betty and other members of his family.

-Jane Buikstra 

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Clark Howell was a fine friend, taking time out years ago to review our manuscript in a related field. We spent many fine hours in discussions around the new journals and books in the famous Bioscience and Natural Resources library at UC Berkeley. His presence will be greatly missed.

-Jack Chamberlain 

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Clark Howell was an inspiration to all paleoanthropologists--it was he who made the term what it is today, an integrative holistic science combining data, method and theory from human paleontology, Paleolithic archaeology and the geological context for these, as well as the broader underpinnings of evolutionary biology, paleontology, primatology and other disciplines. My own career intersected Clark's on many occasions, but never for long enough or frequently enough. As a physics major in college, I switched to paleoanthropology following a course with WW Howells and the influence of the "Early Man" volume. After a first meeting at the American Museum of Natural History in the mid 1960s, I visited him in Chicago in 1968 to look at his new fossil monkeys from Omo, and he was (as always) generous with his time, showing me the human remains as well and allowing me to photograph them all. I was incredibly lucky to have been selected by him to participate in the 1975 Paleoanthropology Delegation to the People's Republic of China as the "vertebrate paleontologist" of the team--given the narrow scope of my own knowledge, I assume this was just a ploy to bring an additional human paleontologist, in the way that Bill Howells was classified as the "human biologist" of the group. In 1981, my family and I spent a few days visiting Ambrona, where Clark and Les Freeman had returned for several seasons. Clark had by then joined the advisory committee for the Ancestors exhibtion, where he helped to convince the AMNH administration to support that project. Clark participated actively in the 1984 Ancestors workshop and symposium, leading the session on Neanderthals and other Late Pleistocene fossils. When he was unable to write up the introduction to this part of the book, I stepped in to summarize the discussions, but never to "replace" him. In 1989, we both attended the conference and excursion organized by Eugne Bonifay and Bernard Vandermeersch to discuss the earliest evidence for human occupation of Europe. Each participant in turn would present their finds and then approach Clark for his assessment of their putative ancient artifacts. Our contacts since then were sporadic but gratifying. Clark would call or eventually email at intervals to ask for some abstruse AMNH publication. He was very supportive of my work at Senze with Claude GuŽrin and Martine Faure, agreeing that this could help understand not only the sequence of European mammal faunas but also the taphonomic effect of human activity. I saw Clark's new lab space in late 2004 during a workshop on Cercopithecidae sponsored by the RHOI project he led with Tim White. The last time I saw Clark was at the July 2006 Bonn celebration of the 150th anniversary of the finding of the Neander Valley fossils. He gave one of the inaugural lectures and another talk, participated in discussion panels and was a center of well-deserved attention. It was great to see him shining among his peers and the many worshipful junior colleagues. Only a few months later, I heard that his health had declined swiftly. Now, a month after his death, I have still not fully internalized the loss. It is truly the end of an era.

-Eric Delson 

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I met Clarck Howell for the first time in Nice meeting at the begining of my PhD on Laetoli rodents (1982! if my memory is fine). I found in him a great interest in my small mammals ,especially rodents that interested him. Then he receive me in his Berkeley's lab in 1985 and I found somebody open to discussions and ready to take time for his students. We never meet again but exchanged letters and mails and I know that he was following my work and articles and asked for my news each time he was coming to France. He also encourages taphonomy and new theories . All anthropology but also palaeontology and Evolution world will miss him !

-Christiane Denys 

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I am very sorry to learn that Professor Howell passed away. I first met him in 1996 in Beijing during the first meeting of International Technique Committee for the Peking Man Project in which he was a member and he was very favorable for the project. Although I can no longer meet him in person, but he will live in my mind for ever.

-Wei Dong 

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I'm very saddened to learn of Clark's passing. Clark Howell was a BIG influence on my life and perspectives on what human evolution meant. I was a undergraduate student of the Berkeley collective (Sherry Washburn, Desmond Clark, Clark Howell, Phyllis Dolhinow, Vince Sarich, and Glynn Isaac) and worked as an undergraduate in Clark's labs. He was my supervisor for my thesis on African Primate Paleobiogeography. I'm sure Clark was aware that he had a huge influence on the field...through his own work, and that of his students and his colleagues. I remember attending the Wenner-Gren Symposium in his honor about ten years ago and could sense that he was proud of the breadth of his influence, and the accomplishments of his former students (and later his peers). Something quite big from an Iowa farm boy who only went to college because of the GI Bill! Just a side note: I have two copies of his famous Time-Life "Early Man". The first is a treasured copy acquired in Ghana when I was a teenager while my family were expats...and it was what compelled me to ask my Dad to go to East Africa on safari rather than back to the US on home leave. That copy was obtained when it was originally published 1966! I later met Louis and Mary Leakey, and Richard...who was just a few years older than I and uninterested at that point in following what his Dad was involved in. We practically used the book as a tour guide visiting not only Olduvai, but Olorgesailie, Lake Nakuru, etc. Of course getting to Omo was an impossibility at that time...but I could dream! The second copy I obtained from a schoolteacher friend in Indonesia. It was a coverless discard from the remote school library of Payakumboh town in Sumatra (BTW near where the recent earthquake struck and the town where Dubois first started to look for fossil man)...this had been translated into Indonesian! I take that book back with me every time that I return to Indonesia...both to improve my Indonesian language abilities, but also to show the local people exactly what we do as Anthropologists! So Clark's reach goes even into tiny Sumatran villages and is the subject of debate and wonderment still. Jerry

-Jerry Drawhorn 

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Clark was an inspiring and supportive influence to me during my graduate years in archaeology at UC Berkeley. While my other professors were pressuring me to take my oral qualifying exams early, Clark understood and supported my wish to read and study archaeology longer and more deeply, before launching myself into a dissertation project. He was invariably helpful, often behind the scenes, as I began my professional career. Since I was technically not one of his graduate students, this was a special mark of the generosity that characterized so much of his dealings with students. We can only hope to emulate those qualities ourselves, so that his scholarly legacy lives on. Salve atque vale, magister meus.

-Diane Gifford-Gonzalez 

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Death is final, but is it? Clark you were so alive to all of us Š your colleagues, your students, your friends and most of all your family. As one of your students I say to people who only knew you from your name on publications, your name on an office door, you were so charismatic but that really doesnÕt describe you. It was the way you engaged us Š your spirit, your compassion, your understanding, your encouragement. Many others will be able to articulate your accomplishments, your illustrious career. Many accolades will be written or said about you Š what you did when you were alive and what you will be remembered for. No one has achieved as much or contributed more in every way in the field of human origins. To me it was as much your humanity, your humility Š you cared for us. So Clark, your spirit will live on Š the light in your eyes, your manner, your intellect Š for those of us who were fortunate to know you, never to be forgotten. We loved you.

-Jack Harris 

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Clark encouraged his students in subtle but lasting ways. He would get to lab very early in the morning, survey the papers on our desks, and make little tick marks next to references that he did not yet have in his massive library. It was his way of endorsing our wide-ranging interests. It was also his way of getting us to make extra copies for him... Clark's desire for knowledge and support of your interests never waned. It was pure, without the pretense so easy for a man so admired, idolized and lionized. Conversations with him always made you feel privileged. He read everything. He wrote back.

-Walter Hartwig 

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I was lucky to have been an undergraduate anthropology major at Berkeley in the early 1980s. I was extremely fortunate to have taken a number of courses with Professor Howell. He consistently demonstrated the breadth of his knowledge about human evolution, as well as many other topics. I was at the time, and still am, amazed by his scholarship. I have had the privilege of teaching introductory biological anthropology at Berkeley this semester, and I can only hope that the tribute I gave Clark in Wheeler Auditorium did justice to his accomplishments.

-Sandra Hollimon 

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The management and the members of the Istituto Italiano di Paleontologia Umana, Rome, Italy, have learned, with great sorrow, the death of Professor F. Clark Howell. For many decades he has been an unforgettable dear friend of our Institute. Sometime he has been present personally, to give us scientific advice and encouragement toward research. We will keep his memory with deep regret. Aldo G. Segre Istituto Italiano di Paleontologia Umana Piazza Mincio 2 00198, Roma, Italy.

-Istituto Ist.Italiano di Paleontologia Umana 

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A great loss to paleoanthropology, but Clark left behind a legacy that will endure. He was one of the major architects of paleoanthopology and his articulation of the transdisciplinary approach is the standard today. I am proud to say I was one of his students at the University of Chicago and thankful for all the opportunities he offered me as a grad student. My sincerest condolences to his wife Betty, son Brian and daughter Jennifer.

-Don Johanson 

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It is with great sadness - but with the utmost admiration - that I leave this testimonial on the passing of a fine scholar and a fine human being. From the first graduate seminar I took with Clark - while still an undergraduate - I knew that I was in the presence of an encyclopedic mind and a warm, generous spirit. Although my doctoral work was under Sarich and my primary focus genetics, Clark was always the kind of person who not only was interested in all aspects of our field, but was knowledgeable and conversant in areas far beyond paleoanthropolgy. He was a true Renaissance man, and one of the least ego-driven academic icons I have ever known. In a sub-field riven by interpersonal conflict, Clark was measured and - dare I say it - statesman-like. It is truly the end of an era, and I shall miss him. Go with Darwin, Clark...

-Jonathan Karpf 

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I became an Africanist rather than a Near Eastern specialist when Clark Howell received funding for fieldwork at Isimila, in then Tanganyika. I have never regretted that happy 'historical accident', resulting in my being his first Ph.d. student. Above and beyond his own field research, Clark was THE great facilitator: he was instrumental in arousing North American interests in both African archaeology and human evolution in the 1950's and 60's. Clark networked with everyone, amateurs, students and professionals, and he shared his networks. With the backing of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, there were workshops and seminars that led to interactions between European, Africanist and North American researchers. Clark believed that progress was achieved by co-operation and communication, not by cutthroat competition-obviously a lesson that did not always rub-off. He was a master synthesizer of large bodies of diverse information, recognizing no disciplinary boundaries to research. He championed multidisciplinary projects, and interdisciplinary student training. One can only say that he left his area of earthly endeavors much greater than he found it.

-Maxine R. Kleindienst 

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It was with great sadness that I learned of Prof. C. Howell death, a man who offered a lot to Palaeontology. I had the luck to meet him on 1976 during his visit to my laboratory in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki to see the Petralona skull. At that time I was beginning my PhD thesis and he gave me important information and help me to get contact with several colleagues in Europe working in related subjects. After that we were in contact untill now. I was waiting him to visit Thessaloniki last October but unfortunately he could not come after his health problems. I shall remember him always with respect and love.

-George Koufos 

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Clark was a special person who influenced me greatly in my formative years and indeed ever since. He was a friend, a colleague, and an example. Clark first came into my life when I was a teenager - he used to visit my parents Louis and Mary at their home and that they thought highly of him impressed me greatly as most of their friends were much older than Clark was at that time. Clark established a model for the interdisciplinary research teams with his lead role in the 1967 International Omo River expedition. His unwillingness to take sides, his openness, his warmth and tact were valuable examples of how science shold be managed in respect to team building and cooperation. We all owe him a great deal. Clark will be sorely missed by all of us here in Nairobi and his knowledge and experience will be missed by our professions. The best we do to honour his life is to get on with the job, find new fossils to answer old and new questions and redouble our efforts to encourage young scientists to follow his path. Richard Leakey

-Richard Leakey 

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I never had the good fortune to study with Clark Howell, but I was always grateful whenever I had the chance to interact with him. He was always kind, wise, knowledgeable and encouraging. He was a great scholar, and I will miss him.

-Dan Lieberman 

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It is with deep sadness and regret to hear of Professor Howell's passing. I was extremely fortunate to have had the opportunity to know and work with him. When I arrived at UC Berkeley in the late 1980s to teach in the Anthropology Department, Clark helped me greatly in providing advice and guidance in my teaching and research. He was particularly helpful when I became involved in the reorganization of the Archaeological Research Facility. I shall always be grateful for his kindness and support. We will all miss him greatly.

-Kent Lightfoot 

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My colleagues and I here in Beijing are very sad to hear Professor Clark Howell passed away. Professor Howell visited our institute several times and set good relationship with many colleagues here. I met Clark last July in Bonn and we had a very long talk. I feel he is a very nice person. We will miss him.

-Wu Liu 

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I met Professor Clark Howell for the first time only about ten years ago. I remember it was in Granada, Spain, and that we spent an entire lunch speaking about his old Italian colleague and friend Alberto (Alberto Carlo Blanc) and about their common way to look at paleoanthropology as holistic approach to the past. It was one of the occasions in my life in which I clearly perceived to have had the privilege to interact with a fundamental pillar for the recent history of our discipline. Now that IÕm stricken by the sad news that he passed away, I would like to express all my sincere condolences to his family and, particularly, to his wife Betty who was sharing with us that memorable (for me) lunch in Granada.

-Giorgio Manzi 

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As most of the people working in Human Evolution, I have a big admiration for Prof. Clark Howell and a big debt with him. I have to say in a personal level that, since I met him on the International Conference at Orce (Spain) on 1995, I was impressed by his knowledge and ideas, and after that he helped me a lot on my research but also on my personal life. He visited us last year in Tarragona for a workshop on climate change, faunal turnovers and human dispersals, and for the presentation of our new Institute. As ever, we learned a lot from him. We will follow your way to increase our knowledge on human origins. Bienvenido Mart’nez-Navarro and all the team of the Institut Catalˆ de Paleoecologia Humana i Evoluci— Social, Tarragona, Spain (IPHES)

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-Bienvenido Mart’nez-Navarro 

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Like everybody else, we in Tanzania are deeply shocked and sadenned at news of the passing away of Prof. Clark Howell. He will be missed by the whole world of Palaeoanthropologists and other scientists. On behalf of my colleagues in Tanzania who may not have heard the news, I wish to send my condolences to the bereaved family. May his soul rest in peace.

-Fidelis T. Masao 

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With the untimely death of Professor Francis Clark Howell, we have lost one of the most important contributors to the field of paleoanthropology. I am an artist/naturalist specializing in paleontology, and I first met and collaborated with Clark in 1964 when he authored the popular tome for Time/Life "Early Man". In the course of developing the layouts for the chapter on australopithecines which I was to illustrate, Clark opened up a whole new focus of subject matter for me, and illustrating paleoanthropology has been my passion ever since. I was particularly impressed with his knowledge of seemingly unrelated fields of study, which he was able to synthesize for a comprehensive analysis of his subjects. Working with this brilliant man was a privilege and an inspiration, and I know my sentiments are shared by innumerable collegues and students. A man's contribution is not limited to his own considerable achievements, but extends to those whom he gave the impetus to excel in their respective careers. Clark Howell was such a man as this.

-Jay Matternes 

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Even gauged by the other eminent anthropology professors at Berkeley from the 1970s-1990s, F. Clark Howell was an unusually knowledgeable and generous person. Few, if any, people possessed Howell's encyclopedic knowledge of paleoanthropology, including Paleolithic archaeology, hominid palaeontology, and vertebrate paleontology. I was his student for a long time, as an undergraduate (in the late 1970s-early 1980s) and for my Ph.D (mid 1980s-mid 1990s). Back then, we students idolized our professors (especially Glynn Ll. Isaac, J. Desmond Clark, and F. Clark Howell) for their great accomplishments and the influential roles they played in developing the field of paleoanthropology. During the 1980s, Howell's students toiled late into the night in his laboratory on the ground floor of Kroeber Hall. We worked on a wide variety of subjects, including australopithecines (B. Asfaw, G. Suwa, P. Kyauka), fossil New World monkeys (W. Hartwig), human paleopathology (S. Anton, G. Richards), Chinese Homo erectus (D. Etler), and Miocene hominoids (me). F. Clark Howell was supportive of all of our work because he understood, better than anyone else, how paleoanthropological data from different sources integrates into a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. I will miss Clark both personally for his many kindnesses and also professionally for his support of all people with a serious interest in the study of human evolutionary history (in its broadest sense).

-Monte McCrossin 

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I had the privilege to meet Professor Howell in my visits to UC Berkeley in 2000 and 2001. He was extraordinarily kindly with me. We talked like old friends and in a few minutes he gave me a lot of knowledge. I will never forget his generosity and big smile when talking about bones. I will always be grateful for his advice. I send my sincere condolences to family and friends of Professor Howell.

-Abigail Meza 

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As a recently graduated archaeologist I met Clark Howell, quite by chance, in Turkey in the late 1980s. It was a wondefully broad-ranging afternoon's conversation, and the sense of encouragement and support that he gave are with me still.

-Mark Nesbitt 

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Clark Howell was Visiting Professor at Berkeley during 1964-65. Many undergraduates, myself included, took both of the two upper division courses he offered. The Spring semester course, Old World Prehistory, showcased his strengths as an organizer, someone who made good things happen by putting the right people together in common cause. On the books, the course was team-taught by Howell and Desmond Clark. Played out in the classroom, it was so much more than that: great lectures by the two leads, with guest performances by Sherry Washburn, Richard Klein and the Bordes, Francois and Denise de Sonneville. The big themes of the time all on display Š the multi-disciplinary approach to prehistory, the beginning of serious interest among Paleolithic specialists in hunter-gatherer ecology, and the emergence of what was the called the New Archaeology. It was without doubt the best single course I took as undergrad, and there was Howell right at the center of it. He will indeed be missed.

-James O'Connell 

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I am deeply saddened to learn of the passing of a man whom I held in the highest regard as a mentor, colleague, and friend. Clark was a member of my comprehensive exam committee at Berkeley in the late 1970s and supervised one of my field statements. I remain indebted to him on many levels and will do so for the remainder of my days...

-John Olsen 

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We, as the excavation team of Yarımburgaz 1988-90 Istanbul-Turkey, remember our dear "Clark Hoca" with deep respect. We miss him very much, but surely remember him forever.

-Mihriban Ozbasaran Yarimburgaz Team 

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I had the privilege and pleasure of knowing Clark for over 25 years at Berkeley, and the pleasure intensified during the last dozen years or so, when our offices came to be located across from each other. We would often meet in the parking lot on the way in, Clark with his briefcase and New York Times, and always a comment on the affairs of the day. If I got in before him he usually peeked in with a word or two when he arrived, and I would sometimes arrive late to find a tearout from Science or Nature under my door that he thought I or my students could use. He was always ready with an invitation to coffee, and we spent many productive hours on wide-ranging topics. Clark believed that no discoveries were of interest independent of their histories. And he knew a great many histories. Clark was generous with his wisdom. He gladly served on graduate student orals and dissertation committees, and readily accepted an invitation to sit in on a large graduate seminar I ran a few years ago that centered on Steve GouldÕs book, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory. It was an incomparable experience to have a person of ClarkÕs stature and learning, who knew most of the principals who founded the Modern Synthesis, and who once shared an office with Julian Huxley. But it was always like that to talk with him. There was nobody in ClarkÕs class. He was an incomparable scholar, a gentleman, a diplomat and ambassador for his often-contentious field, someone who could smooth the waters and explain the issues patiently and reasonably. The regard in which he was held by foreign colleagues is matchless. By dint of his learning, regard for people, and his gentlemanly persona, he influenced a great many decisions and raised a great deal of support for good causes and good science. Few people will know about much of this, because Clark would never draw attention to his own deeds. Above all this loss, however, weÕve lost a terrific friend, a guy who took people as they were, no matter who they were, no matter who he was, and enjoyed all of them. These are the qualities of a true gentleman.

-Kevin Padian 

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We remember the outstanding figure of Prof. C. Howell. A great loss for prehistoric studies whose guide we all miss for ever.

- Palma di Cesnola, A., P. Gambassini, A. Ronchitelli, P. Boscato, A. Moroni, S. Ricci, L. Longo and Ph; Dipart. Sc Amb UR Ecologia Preistorica Univ Siena Italy 

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To this reporter Clark was a tireless, patient, wise, generous and invariably helpful tutor who gave freely of his time to this reporter whenever I asked for help to make sure that what I was writing was as accurate as possible. I'm well aware of what a towering figure he was in his field, whenever I visited him in his lab he was also a wonderful source of lore and an immense amount of just plain fun. I and those of science writing colleagues like John Wilford of the Times who had the privilege of knowing him will remember him always with affection and deep respect.

-David Perlman 

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Professor Howell was kind not only to his students and fellow anthropologists, but also to me as a departmental typist (1982-1989). I remember him fondly. My condolences to his family and friends.

-Barbara Quigley 

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Prof. Howell was one of the most profound influences on my career. When I was an undergraduate at Cal, he was both tolerant and encouraging when he didn't have to be. I have never met anyone before or since with such a broad knowledge and such a humble demeanour. He was the archetype of the scholar I'd like to be.

-Todd C. Rae 

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After returning to Israel from Berkeley in the early 80s and still reeling from the experience of studying there, with Clark, I wrote to him as follows: ŅThe time that I spent at Berkeley and in your lab was undoubtedly one of the highest points in my life. What I learned there has made a tremendous impact on me, both as an anthropologist and as a person. I will also be grateful for your patience, encouragement, and helpÉfrom those first overwhelming days seven years ago through the completion of my thesis last fall. Émy dissertation would not have been realized were it not for your personal involvement in my studies.Ó Clark was not just any mentor. Every photo of him on this site shows his typical expression of attentiveness, interest, and eagerness to learn. Though I am now almost 10 years older than Clark was when we first met over 30 years ago, I still find myself constantly thinking about what he would say and whether he would approve. I loved Clark and miss him dearly.

-Yoel Rak 

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Among the most vivid memories of my life is a two-week period in the Omo valley that Clark Howell allowed me to share with him in 1973. I was a young science reporter on leave from the New York Times, hoping to learn a bit of paleoanthropology. Clark was on his seventh year of work in the Omo. His generosity in letting me visit was extraordinary in itself, but then almost every evening while I was in camp, he would sit with me in front of his tent and, in effect, give me private lessons in everything that was then known about human evolution. I would ask questions, and he would answer in patient detail. I scribbled down notes and tape recorded his comments for hours each evening. Now and then he would ask me to turn off the recorder so that he could divulge some especially juicy tidbit about somebody. That master class in human evolution set me on a course to cover the subject for The Times and other publications for many years afterward. I cannot imagine having had a better teacher. So, Clark not only shaped the careers and insights of many scientists in this field, he shaped the career and perspective of at least one journalist who covered it. The article I wrote about my time with Clark and his crew in the Omo is online and may be of interest to others. It highlights the remarkably interdisciplinary approach Clark brought to paleoanthropology. The link is: http://www.aliciapatterson.org/APF001973/Rensberger/Rensberger04/Rensberger04.html

-Boyce Rensberger 

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F.Clark Howell has left a significant and lasting impression on many generations of students and scholars of human evolution. I am one of them, and can never forget his clearly deep appreciation of all of our subfields, from living primates to skeletons.... and his personal appreciation of each student or scholar who visited his lab. As a new student at UCB I clearly remember his first lectures to our class , with opening remarks NOT about skulls or lateral lips of distal femura, but instead he asked of the class: who of you has been to Bratislava? Or Dresden? I SO loved that about him! In his seminars I did some translations from German and French into English--- and he was with me at every step, from Darwin to Haeckel to Cuvier and more--- His appreciation of LIFE was so wonderful and inspiring, especially in a field that perhaps does not always appreciate the breadth of our imagination. Frieda Rickenbach

-F. Marie Rickenbach 

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With a deep sadness I learned the passing away of Professor Clark Howell. I met him in 1991 in Bloomington, Indiana. Since then he continuously supported and encouraged my research in Algeria. He was among the very few individuals in Paleoanthropology who was genuinely supportive and eager to see Africans excel in this field. It is a great loss to Paleoanthropology. We will miss him.

-Mohamed Sahnouni 

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Clark was my advisor back in the late seventies. He broke academic rules that literally resulted in saving my life. I saw him early last summer in order to thank him. He responded, "You would have done the same for me." I will always be grateful.

-Michael Schwartz 

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Deeply moved and saddened for the death of Professor F. Clark Howell, the very well known scientist and our friend, we wish to express to his family and his coworkers at the University of Berkeley our sincere sorrow and sympathy. We remember him for our friendly and scientific relations, and for his precious advices, which we followed since the far away time of professor A.C.Blanc. His high competency and his real cordiality will always remain in our memory. Aldo and Eugenia Segre.

-Aldo Segre 

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From the time of my arrival at Berkeley in 1990 until the last time I saw him a number of months ago, Clark was supportive and affable at all times. I enjoyed our discussions about world politics, and while our regions of interest were very different, he knew many of the characters in western North American archaeology. I was always amazed at the breadth of his interests, his stature on the world stage, and IÕll miss our political discussions very much. Adios, Clark.

-Steve Shackley 

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I was saddened to learn of Clark HowellÕs passing and extend my sympathies to Betty and the family. Strangely, although Clark and I have had extensive interactions we never met in the field, even though both of us carried out many field programs overseas. Clark was a true friend to, and important promoter of, physical anthropology and the study of Human Origins. We often had occasion to meet when he served on panels reviewing departments in our field or even assessing primate centers and perhaps few will realize how his thoughtful and supportive views reported through such panels helped the profession grow. His many contributions derived from his far-ranging, multidisciplinary interests in archaeology, anatomy and geology and his talent for seeing the Ņwhole-pictureÓ behind the numerous discoveries made on the extensive and diverse explorations he raised funds for, then managed and directed. His imprint on some of the most prominent students of human origins is indisputable, as was his educational stimulation of both students coming from Africa and equally the many American students who, with Clark, carried out research there or in Spain and Turkey. He also held an important role in support of the Leakey Foundation and of the Wenner-GrenÕs celebrated casting program of the 1960s that made possible widespread three dimensional awareness of the nature of many early hominid fossils. His important Time-Life Nature Library book ŅHuman OriginsÓ, 1965, came out just at a critical time for building the whole field studying our origins. Altogether, for doing so much to help document the true history of mankindÕs common past we owe him a great debt that must not be forgotten, especially in confused times such as we all now have to live with. ---Elwyn Simons

-Elwyn Simons 

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I was never Clark's student, but I remember well his kindness to me when as a young graduate student I asked for his help in getting access to study Neandertal remains in France. He provided that help, and considerably more on other occasions. In addition to his scholarly abilities and innumerable scientific contributions, Clark was first and foremost a very fine and humble human being. He leaves a void both in terms of what he did as a scientist and the kind of person he was.

-Fred Smith 

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Clark was for me the epitome of a scholar-scientist. Studying with him still ranks as one of the most important episodes in my life, and I have tried to pass on some of the values he stood for. His modesty, honesty, depth of knowledge and scientific thirst are rare qualities. I'm proud to have known him and glad to have had the opportunity of spending some time with him at the Neanderthal conference in Bonn last year. At that time he still seemed to be one of the immortals and I shall always cherish that memory.

-Pat Smith 

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Clark Howell was my first professor of prehistory/paleoanthropology. Although Chairman of the Anthropology Department at Chicago at the time, he took the time to give me--then a sophomore in the College--a private reading class in French Paleolithic prehistory in preparation for my going to dig with Francois Bordes that summer. I will never forget it! Clark knew everything and everyone involved in the study of early humans. He was the master of masters, and an extraordinary mentor, friend, and human being. He and Desmond Clark, the founders of "American" Paleoanthropology as we know it, were also true gentlemen and giants of science and humanity. They cannot be replaced. Many years after my early Chicago experiences with him, I was pleased and honored to be able to invite Clark to UNM as one my Journal of Anthropological Research Distinguished Lecturers. The Lecture had a packed hall and the resultant publication was as always sweeping, definitive and superb. Clark was a good friend to not only me, but also to the Journal. JAR will be publishing tributes to Clark in its upcoming Summer 2007 issue by Susan and Les Freeman, as well as by myself. Rest in peace, great soul!

-Lawrence Straus 

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It is with great sadness that researchers at the Palaeolithic Department (Neuwied) of the Ršmisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz have learned of the death of Prof. Frank Clark Howell. A number of us first met Clark in 1988 at Andernach in the Rhineland when he participated in a meeting on ŅThe earliest hominid settlement of EuropeÓ, shortly after Palaeolithic research was established within a Department of the RGZM. During the next several years our paths crossed at a number of international conferences, occasions upon which Clark was always very interested to hear about developments in our institute. In June 1997 Clark held the annual Rudolf Virchow Public Lecture and enthralled everyone with his recollection of ŅEin halbes Jahrhundert PalŠoanthropologie: ein persšnliches ResŸmeeÓ (A half century of palaeoanthropology: a personal resume) presented in German to a broad audience drawn from all walks of life. In the same year he served on the advisory panel during our institutional evaluation and with his careful guidance helped ensure that the research themes of the Palaeolithic Department were successfully presented to maximum effect. Most Department researchers were able to spend several hours catching up with Clark at the Neanderthal conference in Bonn 2006, while a new generation had the opportunity to meet him for the first time. In retrospect it was an irony of fate to have met for the last time so close to where some of us first made ClarkÕs acquaintance. Clark will be remembered as one of the outstanding figures working in human evolution and a pioneer who helped form the field as it exists today. All who knew him will miss his generous sharing of knowledge and ideas and his considerate encouragement of younger colleagues. We send our sincere condolences to ClarkÕs family. Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser, Martin Street, Olaf Jšris, Elaine Turner, Antje Justus

-Martin Street 

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It has been my privilege to know Clark right through my career since 1974. We first spent a decent amount of time together when we were in Turkey in 1977, and out of that came our paper on the Petralona skull, with John Melentis (sadly also no longer with us). Our paths crossed many times since, and it was wonderful to share a lovely evening with Clark on the Rhine last summer (see picture on this website). His contributions were important in so many areas, but personally I think his early and innovative papers on the Neanderthals laid the groundwork for much of the research we do today. We will miss him and his wisdom so much.

-Chris Stringer 

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I was shocked and deeply saddened to learn of Clark's passing. It is with great admiration, respect and thanks that I recall his generous nature and support as a member of my dissertation committee. He lives on in the minds and hearts of his colleagues and the many students, myself included, who were lucky enough to have crossed his path.

-Carole Sussman 

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I was deeply saddened when learning of Clark's death. I first met Clark at an AAPA meeting in 1957 and we have remained friends for fifty years. We had three things in common: we were born the same year, were in the US Navy during WWII, and were anthropologists. He will be sorely missed and paleoanthropology has lost one of its finest scholars.

-Daris R. Swindler 

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Pour moi, Clark Howell reste toujours vivant. La vie est ainsi faite. Son ouverture d'esprit et ses engagements dans la recherche sur notre origine resteront gravŽs dans notre mŽmoire. J'ai toujours trouvŽ auprs de lui conseils et encouragements. Quand j'ai dŽbutŽ ma prospection dans la vallŽe de l'Awash, il a ŽtŽ celui qui m'a convaincu du grand potentiel anthropologique de cette vallŽe. Il ne s'est jamais mis en avant. Beaucoup de chercheurs peuvent en tŽmoigner. N'est ce pas? Notre devoir de mŽmoire est de poursuivre son oeuvre et surtout sa faon qu'il avait pour reconnaitre les jeunes talents et le travail en Žquipe. Je dis ˆ tous ses proches,famille et amis, combien sa disparition m'Žmeut. Que la vie est courte. Maurice Taieb. taieb@cerege.fr

-Maurice Taieb 

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We were shocked to hear about the passing away of Prof. Clark Howell, a great loss that striked the whole international scientific community, in particular the paleontological one. We would like to say we fully share the sadness of his family, close friends and colleagues. We knew well Prof. Howell (he was on the Ph.D. committee of one of us) and really appreciated his huge heart and mind qualities. For us, as African paleontologists, he will remain an exceptional man, who devoted so much effort to help the development of paleoanthropology and paleontology on our continent. We would like to express here our deepest sympathy with all those who met and liked him. Again, we share and have the greatest respect for their pain. We hope our testimony will help soothing their sadness.

-Dr. Mackaye Hassane Ta•sso and Dr. Likius Andossa, DŽpartement de PalŽontologie, UniversitŽ de NÕDjamŽna, Tchad 

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I met Clark in April of '84 at the Ancestors Symposium. On the first night of meetings we ended up sitting across from one another, next to a mirrored wall, in a small swank restaurant. Six others sat at our table. Clark and I talked and talked. I had lost my husband to cancer three months prior. I remember him looking at me towards the end of the meal and saying, "You'll make it." I remember his voice, it wasn't a platitude, it was something he had discerned and knew as fact - of course, he was right. At that symposium I met many of the greats of paleoanthropology; we became friends and soon I was driving from Wyoming to Berkeley and elsewhere. In time I stayed with the Howell's and they with us. Through the years both Clark and Betty were there; always there, as friends and mentor. Accepting the reality of Clark's death will be very difficult for a great many people - he touched so many minds and hearts; he was a marvelous, one-of-a-kind individual.

-Carole Travis-Henikoff 

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Clark and I became colleagues when I started my career as Instructor of Anatomy at the University of Chicago in 1964. I moved to Berkeley in 1969 and I was delighted when Clark came the next year. We never worked together formally, but we were friendly colleagues, and I lectured occasionally in his courses. Clark was always very supportive of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, where I have spent my career, and I was happy when he formally joined the MVZ faculty a few years ago and when the HERC became connected to MVZ. I enjoyed many conversations and delightful social events with Clark, dating back to the 1960's. The celebration of 80th birthday was especially pleasant and memorable. I miss him greatly.

-David Wake 

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Not only paleoanthropology, but also the study of fossil carnivores has lost a guiding light. In my work on African carnivores I have spent much time catching up with his views, insights and ideas on the animals for which we shared such a great fondness. It saddens me greatly that I shall never again have the opportunity to sit down and discuss our shared interests with him.

-Lars Werdelin 

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I first met Clark Howell in the Fall of 1968 when he gave a slide presentation about the work of the Omo Research Expedition at the University of Colorado at Boulder. I was a graduate student then in the Biology Department, and in response to his talk, he and I engaged in fervent dialogue well into the evening (over a hearty meal washed down with copious ammounts of wine)--a discussion focused upon the species diversity problem and its relevance for human evolution. Because of this propitous trail crossing, I decided to switch fields, and much to my great surprise (with Clark's blessing and support), I was accepted into the Department of Anthropology at UC Berkeley in 1969 for my doctoral work, an event that moved my life into unprecedented and unexpected directions. A year later, Clark joined the faculty at Berkeley and not surprisingly, we had a great deal to discuss. A year later, he invited me into the field, to join his expedition in the Lower Omo Valley of Ethiopia to take up a very specific project for my dissertaion research, an event that would bring me into connection with Louis and Mary Leakey, their son Richard and his then new wife Meave, Don Johanson and Frank Brown and Jean De Heinzelin, Bill Bishop and Glynn Issac and Desmond Clark and all the others involved in the field of paleoanthropology. My relationship with Clark also brought me into relationship with Tim White with whom I have been working for the past 13 years in the Middle Awash Valley. However, it was those three field seasons that I spent with Clark in the Omo from 1971-73 that remain in my mind as a time of greatness. There was an air of enchantment that prevailed during that period of my mentorship with him, a time in which he and I did survey and excavation together, hunted gazelles for the camp kitchen together, repaired vehicles together (with Frank and Don), and a time in which we took great delight in each others company. It was during those days that we recognized each other as kindred spirits, as fellow investigators of the Great Mystery, and it was in that time that we became friends for life. Clark Howell was a scholar's scholar, a great scientist who has left deep footprints for all the rest of us to follow. He was a wizard, a great one in his own right and in our own time. He was also a very nice man. It is an honor to have been his student and to have known him as a friend of almost 40 years, and on the altar in my heart, a candle will burn for him forever.

-Hank Wesselman 

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Clark transformed the study of human origins from just "stones and bones" to a much broader discipline. His knowledge of paleoanthropology was unparalleled and his commitment and support of the Leakey Foundation is irreplaceable. The Leakey Foundation will deeply miss his knowledge, enthusiasm, wisdom, and support. - Bill Wirthlin, friend and Leakey Foundation President

-Bill Wirthlin 

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It was hard to believe the sad news that Clark Howell, one of the foremost scientists of the 20th Century passed away. Sometimes I thought renowned people like Clark that achieved so much with tireless life-long contribution to science and society had no time for death. ClarkÕs majestic personality and his scientific legacy and integrity will continue to invigorate many of us that worked closely with him and the larger scientific community for a long time to come. On a personal note, ClarkÕs support and encouragement was priceless to the successes and achievement of the Middle Awash project. We will miss his invaluable guidance and advise. On the other hand, we had the luxury of decades of ClarkÕs mentorship and I promise we will carry this scientific heritage to achieve more in our research endeavors and commemorate ClarkÕs legacy forever.

-Giday WoldeGabriel 

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